YOU’RE HERE. COME ON IN.

Maybe you’ve been to other counselors, and, for whatever reason, you’re not looking them up right now. Maybe you’ve tried everything you can think of, and now you’re searching for a counselor for the first time. Either way, you’re reaching out and hoping I can be helpful.

If you can feel relaxed, open, and honest with a counselor, then you are likely to get something out of the experience. If you can feel relaxed, open, honest, AND confident in their skills and approach, then you will definitely get what you need. Not every counselor is right for every person. I went through several before I found the person I could like, trust, and get what I needed. That right person is so important to find.

When we work together, you will feel understood, accepted and respected. You can expect a counselor who will meet you exactly where you are. You’re in the thick of things, maybe at the end of your rope, and you need to be heard and understood. From the get-go, we’ll figure out what you need and how to get you there.

LET’S FIGURE THIS OUT.

When you’re searching for a counselor, you’re probably wondering…

  • Can he make a difference?
  • How different will this be from the other counselors I’ve tried?
  • How long will it take?

The short answers are yes, very, and I don’t know (but we’ll start working from day one).

Counseling is important because it works. You can come unstuck, even if you feel like you’ve tried everything or that your problem is too big to handle. You will move through a process of connecting, gaining awareness, figuring out where you want your life to go, and then getting there. I’ve learned what works, and people have grown immeasurably through our work together.

If counseling is going to be helpful, feeling understood is the most important element. That means having a counselor who knows how to join you where you are, understand the gravity of your situation, and laugh when it’s funny. You make a big decision when you decide to go talk to someone you don’t know about the most important and most personal parts of your life! I get it.

HERE’S MORE INFO (including jargon, education, and experience!)

Gifted, talented, creative, asynchronous, overexcitable, twice exceptional, highly sensitive, intense, quirky – If you see yourself or your teen in this list, know that I specialize in work with gifted teens, adults, and families. Other practice focuses include: Experiencing Divorce, School Performance, Anxiety/Depression, and Retirement Success.

My service ethic led me from Warren Wilson College to community reconciliation work in Belfast, Northern Ireland. From there I continued a trajectory toward a career in service. In 2001, I graduated from Western Carolina University with a degree in Community Counseling, and I’ve been a practicing counselor ever since. In addition to working with clients, I also serve as a City Council Member for the city of Asheville, North Carolina.

At our first session, I’ll ask you a version of this question, “If we are successful, what is going to be different in your life/lives?” From there we’ll keep our eyes on solutions, through a style that incorporates Solution Focused Brief Therapy, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Family Systems Theory, Narrative Therapy, and Existential Therapy.

I live in West Asheville with my wife. I enjoy chess, writing, leisure sports, travel, movies, and spending time with family and friends. You’ll often see me riding my bike around town. I love Asheville, and I find great satisfaction in offering competent, compassionate service to the people who live here.

RECENT TRAININGS

Asynchronous Development: Practical Applications of A Concept Born from Experience – The Columbus Group.

Professionals’ Training for Treating Survivors of Narcisstic Abuse

Understanding Neuropsychological Assessment

The Gifted: Frustrated and Misunderstood – part of SENG’s Misdiagnosis Initiative

Being Seen: Self Concept Development in Gifted Adults

The Psychological and Emotional Costs of the Freeze Response in Gifted Students Over a Lifetime.

The Search for Meaning: Existential Issues for Gifted Children